Choose to vote

Vote early. Vote by mail-in ballot. Vote at the polls on Nov. 6.

But vote.

Voting is a privilege that we enjoy as Americans. Whether or not you feel that your vote counts, itís a responsibility that we need to fulfill.

In 1971, the 26th amendment to the Constitution changed the minimum age to vote at 18 and I would be 18 in the next presidential election.

When I was first of voting age, there was a lot of anger and anti-establishment feelings running high. Sit-ins, peace rallies, and walks against something or other were prevalent. Many were against the war in Vietnam and we felt that NOT voting was a way to say ďIím not going to do what you want me to do!Ē. It was an open act of rebellion, and we thought we were making a statement.

Little did we know that we were passing up on an opportunity to MAKE a statement! By voting for the president of our choice, that stood for what we stood for, we would have been able to, perhaps, see the feelings that we had validated and justified. Instead, we saw it as a way to endorse the ďestablishment.Ē

I feel differently now, and, right or wrong, good or bad, I always vote. I vote my conscience and I vote for the person who, I think, stands for and says publicly the things that I feel are what this country needs; the things with which I agree.

Does it always work out to be what I want? Of course not. But, I know inside that Iíve done my duty as an American and a person.

Voting. Itís a privilege, and a right, that I treasure.

Jeanne Archambeault

Mancos Times editor